IraqNadia Murad

Nadia Murad Biography, WIki, Age, Parents, Husband (Abid Shamdeen), Engagement, Captivity, Career, Nobel Peace Prize 2018

5th October 2018, The 2018 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.

Nadia Murad Biography

Nadia Murad Bio

Nadia Murad Basee Taha was born in 1993 in Kojo. She is a Yazidi Kurdish human rights activist from Iraq. Since September 2016 she has been the first Goodwill Ambassador for the Dignity of Survivors of Human Trafficking of the United Nations (UNODC). Murad’s mission is sponsored and supported by Nadia’s Initiative. She was kidnapped and held by the Islamic State in August 2014. On 1st June 2017, she returned to her home village of Kojo after three years.

On 5th October 2018, she and Doctor Denis Mukwege were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for “their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.”

Nadia Murad Age She was born in 1993 (age 24–25) in Kojo, Iraq
Nadia Murad Faince Abid Shamdeen
Nadia Murad Parents Murad Ismail
Nadia Murad Books The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State
Occupation Human rights activist
Years active 2014–present
Nadia Murad Awards Nobel Peace Prize 2018, Glamour Award for The Woman Who Stood Up to ISIS

Nadia Murad Early life

Murad was born in the village of Kojo in Sinjar, Iraq. Her family, of the Yazidi ethno-religious minority, were farmers.

Nadia Murad Captivity

At the age of 19, Murad was a student living in the village of Kojo in Sinjar, northern Iraq when Islamic State fighters rounded up the Yazidi community in the town killing 600 people – including six of Murad’s brothers and stepbrothers – and taking the younger women into slavery. That year Murad was one of more than 6,700 Yazidi women taken prisoner by Islamic State in Iraq. She claims she was held as a slave in the city of Mosul, and allegedly beaten, burned with cigarettes, and raped when trying to escape. Murad was able to escape after her captor left the house unlocked. She was taken in by a neighbouring family who were able to smuggle her out of the Islamic State-controlled area, allowing her to make her way to a refugee camp in Duhok, northern Iraq. In February 2015, she gave her first testimony to reporters of the Belgian daily La Libre Belgique while she was staying in the Rwanga camp, living in a container. In 2015, she was one of 1000 women and children to benefit from a refugee programme of the Government of Baden-Württemberg, Germany, which became her new home.

Nadia Murad Fiance (Abid Shamdeen)

Nadia Murad, who has tried to loosen shackles of the past, recently announced her plans to be married. Her engagement comes at a time when members of her Yazidi community, an ancient religious minority, face an uncertain future in northern Iraq. Her fiancé, Abid Shamdeen, 30, is a former interpreter for the U.S. Army and a human rights activist. “Despite all the difficulties that we were going through, he was always there. He was supportive,” Murad tells NPR.

Shamdeen says of Murad, “Obviously she’s a courageous woman. She is courageous, and she’s smart, she’s strong. And she’s a fighter.”

Nadia Murad Fiance
Nadia Murad Fiance

Nadia Murad Career Highlights

  • On 16 December 2015, Murad briefed the United Nations Security Council on the issue of human trafficking and conflict, the first time the Council was ever briefed on human trafficking.
  • As of September 2016, Attorney Amal Clooney spoke before the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to discuss the decision that she had made in June 2016 to represent Murad as a client in a legal action against ISIL commanders. Clooney characterized the genocide, rape, and trafficking by ISIL as a “bureaucracy of evil on an industrial scale,” describing it as a slave market existing both online, on Facebook and in the Mideast that is still active today. Murad has received serious threats to her safety as a result of her work.
  • In September 2016, Murad announced “Nadia’s Initiative” at an event hosted by Tina Brown in New York City. The initiative will provide advocacy and assistance to victims of genocide.
  • On 3 May 2017, Murad met Pope Francis and Archbishop Gallagher in the Vatican City. During the meeting, she “asked for helping Yazidis who are still in ISIS captivity, acknowledged the Vatican support for minorities, discussed the scope for an autonomous region for minorities in Iraq, highlighted the current situation and challenges facing religious minorities in Iraq and Syria particularly the victims and internally displaced people as well as immigrants.
  • Her memoir, The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State, was published by Crown Publishing Group on 7 November 2017.

Nadia Murad Honours

  • 5th January 2016: 2016 Nobel Peace Prize nomination by the Iraqi government for activism. A Norwegian lawmaker, Audun Lysbakken, Norwegian MP representing Socialist Left, seconded the nomination.
  • 16th September 2016: First Goodwill Ambassador for the Dignity of Survivors of Human Trafficking of the United Nations.
  • 10th October 2016: Council of Europe Vaclav Havel Award for Human Rights.
  • 27th October 2016: Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought (with Lamiya Aji Bashar).
  • 5th October 2018: Nobel Peace Prize (with Denis Mukwege)

Nadia Murad Nobel Peace Prize 2018

On Friday 5th October 2018, The 2018 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.

The pair received the award for their “effort to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict”, Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of the Nobel Committee, announced at a press conference in the Norweigan capital, Oslo, on Friday.

“Denis Mukwege is the helper who has devoted his life to defending his victims,” said Reiss-Andersen.

“Nadia Murad is the witness who tells of the abuses perpetrated against herself and others. Each of them, in their own way, has helped to give greater visibility to wartime sexual violence”

 

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Moses

Moses Njoroge is the Senior Editor at Glob Intel, a news and IT service provider company. He has a wide range of experience in freelance writing, Web/System Development and other related IT services.
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